GIBNEY DANCE PRESENTS WINTER–SPRING 2017 SEASON

Making Space Returns with New Works by Amanda Loulaki, Marguerite Hemmings, The Bureau for the Future of Choreography, Hilary Easton

An Evening of Works by Disabled and Non-disabled Artists and Companies Including AXIS Dance Company, Kinetic Light and Marissa Perel

Gibney Dance Company Performs Re-imagined Works by Reggie Wilson and New Work by Joanna Kotze, Curates an Evening of Performances by ColemanCollective, MADBOOTS and Manuel Vignoulle

Work Up Presents Nine Emerging Artists Over Three Weeks

Sorry I Missed Your Show Offers Screenings and Discussions of Recent Works by Melinda Ring, Nora Chipaumire, Andrea Kleine

Free Public Gallery Exhibitions All Season

Gibney Dance announces today its Winter–Spring 2017 Season at Lower Manhattan’s Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center featuring the return of signature series Making Space, focused on work by mid-career artists; Work Up, dedicated to the development of work by emerging dance and performance artists; and Sorry I Missed Your Show, its dance-on-film screening and discussion series. A full slate of free and open-to-the-public exhibitions will also take place in the Center’s versatile Gallery.

Making Space, Gibney Dance’s flagship series presenting work by mid-career artists, takes place across the Center’s performance spaces and features evenings of new work by Amanda Loulaki, Marguerite Hemmings, The Bureau for the Future of Choreography, Hilary Easton and an evening of works by disabled and non-disabled artists and companies including AXIS Dance Company, Kinetic Light and Marissa Perel. Also as part of Making Space, Gibney Dance Company presents the second edition of GRIT—Gibney Repertory Initiative for Tomorrow, with a commissioned work by Joanna Kotze and re-imagined works by Reggie Wilson, as well as its first-ever Company-curated program featuring performances by ColemanCollective, MADBOOTS and Manuel Vignoulle.

Studio C is dedicated to Work Up in April, the Gibney Dance series that seeks to put new ideas on stage by supporting the development of emerging dance and performance artists whose work demonstrates risk, relevance and research. The series is committed to building significant context around the works, from the initial submission process to the final performance experience. This is done, in part, through the development of an exhibition component in the gallery to be shown in conjunction with the performances. Nine artists will be presented over the course of three weeks, all of which will be announced January 16.

Sorry I Missed Your Show is Gibney Dance’s dance-on-film screening and discussion series that opens dialogues around dance performances that were controversial or sold out, as well as historical works, dance documentaries and other movement-related films. Through panel discussions following the screenings, the series unpacks issues and questions raised in footage of live performance as they relate to the current state of the dance community and our culture at large. This year Melinda Ring, Nora Chipaumire and Andrea Kleine host screenings and discussions of recent works. See below for full details of all of the above.

Formed in 1991 by Gina Gibney, Gibney Dance boasts 25 years of international performance through Gibney Dance Company; social justice and humanitarian work on a global scale through Gibney Dance Community Action; and forward-thinking service to the dance community through the two-venue Gibney Dance Center at 890 and 280 Broadway. As always, the season includes a full slate of Gibney Dance’s professional development and educational programs for the dance community; 365 Movement Workshops a year that use dance to support survivors of intimate partner violence; in-school assemblies that work to promote healthy relationships and prevent violence for youth; and robust social justice programming at the Community Action Hub at 280 Broadway, as well as internationally as part of Gibney Dance’s Global Community Action Residency program.

FULL EVENT DETAILS ORGANIZED BY SERIES:

MAKING SPACE

Making Space, Gibney Dance’s flagship series presenting work by mid-career artists, takes place across the venues of the Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street). $15–20, tickets and additional information available at GibneyDance.org/MakingSpace.

Amanda Loulaki
house of winds: a process for Untitled 2

Thursday, February 2–Saturday, February 4 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, February 4 at 5 p.m.

Studio C at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

house of winds: a process for Untitled 2 examines the architectural relationship between the moving body and the space that contains it. The work builds a sensory environment in which all elements in the performance space become equal with the performer. In a random manner, the audience becomes the performer’s path. Presence is manifested through the realization that all that matters is the different ways in which we perceive reality. Pause gives meaning to time and sense to presence. In house of winds, “it is what it is” becomes the mantra.

house of winds: a process for Untitled 2 is the last part of a trilogy exploring the ways that an audience’s gaze can be engaged during performance using the body as the primary medium for this exploration.

Marguerite Hemmings
we free

Thursday, February 23–Saturday, February 25 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, February 25 at 5 p.m.

Agnes Varis Performance Lab at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

we free is a multimedia project that looks at the millennial approach to liberation through its music, social dance and social media. we free is centered in the livelihood and reparation of the African continent and diaspora. It is a social experiment, a conversation, a non-performance, a call to action, a bashment party, an ode to—and in moments a critique of—the millennial generation and what we are doing, right now, to be free.

AXIS Dance Company, Kinetic Light and Marissa Perel
Our Configurations

Featuring works by disabled and non-disabled artists and companies
Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m.

The Theater at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

AXIS Dance Company
Marc Brew presents Remember When, a work that draws upon exposure, peeling away layers, line and extension, intricate folding and placement and replacement. This intimate solo performance opens a conversation of remembrance, looking from past to present. AXIS Dance Company also presents Sonya Delwaide’s Dix minutes plus tard, performed by company members Julie Crothers and Alivia Schaffer.

Kinetic Light
Descent From Beauty responds to Auguste Rodin’s sculpture Toilette of Venus and Andromeda. Rodin depicts the figures of Venus and Andromeda together, perhaps in acknowledgment of the ways the lives of both figures are defined by mythological ideas of beauty. Descent invents a story for Venus and Andromeda, exploring their relationship; the effects of heterosexual, masculinized notions of beauty on their lives; and the injustices that accompany beauty into the world.

Marissa Perel
(do not) despair solo traces choreography, disability, queerness and intimacy through language, power and consent. Exploring the politics of care and pity, Perel reconfigures the performer-audience relationship to create a space for a body in pain. Quoting texts by artists with disabilities, survivors and queer writers, she searches for a means of translation between the felt experience of pain and the way it can or cannot be communicated to the world. Futility, loss and the incomprehensible are integral to the journey from one’s body to another.

The Bureau for the Future of Choreography
1776

Thursday, March 9–Saturday, March 11 at 8 p.m.

Studio C at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

In 1776, The Bureau for the Future of Choreography engages several choreographic structures inherent to democratic process. The Bureau is an apparatus that collectively builds performance experiences and documents, striving for group decision-making and exploring not only group dynamics but also states of embodiment and myths of individual and collective authorship. It produces permeating archives of dance/performance and subsequent heterogeneous histories. The Bureau is a state of flux, shifting appearance according to the specific context. Rather than “products,” The Bureau is forever involved in research processes and practices to investigate participatory images of performance and systems of choreography.

Gibney Dance Company
GRIT—Gibney Repertory Initiative for Tomorrow: Joanna Kotze + Reggie Wilson

Thursday, May 4–Saturday, May 13 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 13 at 5 p.m.

Studio C at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

Gibney Dance Company’s GRIT series “makes space for the future of dance” by commissioning new works and reimagining signature works by contemporary dance artists. GRIT posits the possibility that the present generation’s work will be recognized and celebrated in live performance by future audiences. This spring, the Company is thrilled to present works by Joanna Kotze and Reggie Wilson.

Joanna Kotze will create a new work, Already Ready. With an original sound score by Ryan Seaton, Already Ready challenges both dancers and viewers to be fully present, active and visible. Created through daily investigations of individuality and physicality, the work will tap into the multiplicity of life by allowing for the emergence of uniqueness, form and the unknown.

Reggie Wilson of Fist and Heel Performance Group will re-imagine three of his previous pieces, PANG, The DEW WET and Big Brick—A Man’s Piece into a work utilizing the five members of Gibney Dance Company.

Hilary Easton + Co.
Radiator

Thursday, May 11–Saturday, May 13 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 13 at 5 p.m.

Studio C at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

Radiator is a dance and video work choreographed by Hilary Easton and performed by renowned downtown dancers Alexandra Albrecht, Michael Ingle and Jessica Weiss. A meditation on beauty and the sublime, the work explores the ways a dance can be simultaneously quiet and powerful. By establishing an atmosphere of reserve and intimacy, Radiator invites the audience to experience truths about both the performers and the dance itself. With video created by Hilary Easton in collaboration with Tei Blow.

ColemanCollective, MADBOOTS and Manuel Vignoulle
Gibney Dance Company-Curated Performance

Thursday, May 18–Saturday, May 20 at 8 p.m.

The Theater at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center, 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street)

The new Gibney Dance Company-curated performance initiative is an outlet for diverse choreographers who share the values of the Company’s unique model, viewing dance artists as innovators, generators and activists. For this inaugural program the Company’s Artistic Associates have prioritized artists who are working with an aesthetic of physical rigor, uncompromising tenacity and a drive to move the dance field forward, aiming to “make space” for entrepreneurial artists using their craft to amplify the relevance of the dance community and position dancers as influential citizens in the world.

WORK UP

Work Up puts new ideas on stage by supporting the development of emerging dance and performance artists whose work demonstrates risk, relevance and research. The series is committed to building significant context around the works, from the initial submission process to the final performance experience. This is done, in part, through the development of an exhibition component in the Gallery at the Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center.

All Work Up artists and programs to be announced Monday, January 16.

Tickets $10. All performances take place in Studio C at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street). Tickets and additional information available at GibneyDance.org/WorkUp.

Work Up 3.1
Friday, April 7–Saturday, April 8 at 8 p.m.

Work Up 3.2
Friday, April 14–Saturday, April 15 at 8 p.m.

Work Up 3.3
Friday, April 21–Saturday, April 22 at 8 p.m.

SORRY I MISSED YOUR SHOW
Sorry I Missed Your Show is a dance-on-film screening and discussion series that opens dialogues around dance performances that were controversial or sold out, as well as historical works, dance documentaries and other movement-related films. Through panel discussions following the screenings, the series unpacks issues and questions raised in footage of live performance as they relate to the current state of the dance community and our culture at large.

Sorry I Missed Your Show events are free and open to the public, and take place at Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway (enter at 53A Chambers Street). Information available at gibneydance.org/SIMYS.

Melinda Ring
Forgetful Snow (2014)

February 2 at 6 p.m.

Nora Chipaumire
portrait of myself as my father (2016)

April 20 at 6 p.m.

Andrea Kleine
Screening Room, or, The Return of Andrea Kleine (2014)

May 11 at 6 p.m.

GALLERY EXHIBITIONS

The white-walled exhibition space located in the atrium of the Gibney Dance: Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway presents a rare opportunity to reframe the dialogue between the fields of visual arts and dance. All exhibitions are free and open to the public. Information available at GibneyDance.org/Gallery.

The First 100 Days
January–February 2017

This exhibition asks artists to look toward President-Elect Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office, creating artwork in response to the inauguration and the tense political environment likely to come.

Gallery Resident Artist Exhibition
March 2017

For the month of March, a single artist takes over the Gibney Dance gallery space for a site-specific installation.

Work Up
April 2017

Emerging dance artists selected as part of the Work Up performance series present visual and written pieces that contextualize their choreographic works.

Gibney Dance Community Action
May–June 2017

An exhibition in collaboration with Gibney Dance’s Community Action program explores the power of photography to shed light on domestic violence.

ABOUT GIBNEY DANCE

Gibney Dance, founded in 1991, is a trailblazing organization that brings the possibility of movement where it otherwise would not exist. Through its Center, Company and Community Action, Gibney Dance is “Making Space for Dance” in studios, on stages and in partnership with underserved shelters and schools:

Gibney Dance Centers are a powerhouse of cultural support for the performing arts community and New York City itself. In 1991, Gibney Dance began leasing a studio in the historic 890 Broadway building to house Company rehearsals, and by 2011 the organization’s presence at that location had expanded to comprise an expansive eight-studio creative center. Today, with the addition of 280 Broadway, the organization directs a performing arts complex with two facilities: the Choreographic Center at 890 Broadway and the Agnes Varis Performing Arts Center at 280 Broadway. These remarkable spaces enable a robust roster of events designed to meet the needs of the dance field and audiences by fostering the creative process, encouraging dialogue and providing professional development opportunities.

Gibney Dance Company is the Center’s acclaimed resident dance ensemble, led by choreographer Gina Gibney. Since its founding in 1991, the Company has steadily developed its reputation for excellence, building a repertory of over thirty works. Gibney Dance re-envisioned the Company in 2016, empowering its dancers as both artists and activists. Known as Artistic Associates, these dedicated partners advance the quality of the organization’s artistry through performance, and deepen its community engagement through administrative fellowships, serving as advocates for pressing issues in the dance field.

Gibney Dance Community Action is on the leading edge of mobilizing the arts to address social justice issues. This highly respected program uses dance to help heal and empower survivors of interpersonal violence through multiple platforms, including Movement Workshops for domestic violence survivors; Global Community Action Residencies that share the program’s model and practices internationally; the Community Action Hub at 280 Broadway and its resources for social change-minded artists; and Advocacy Initiatives that spread awareness and mobilize artists to respond to social issues.

FUNDING CREDITS

Gibney Dance’s Fall 2016 Season has been made possible with generous support from the Howard Gilman Foundation.

Additional supporters of Making Space include the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Commissioner Tom Finkelpearl in partnership with the City Council, the Shubert Foundation, the Jerome Robbins Foundation, and the Harkness Foundation for Dance.

Gibney Dance Foundation Support

Altman Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Barbara Bell Cumming Foundation, Booth Ferris Foundation, Bossak/Heilbron Charitable Foundation, Dance and New Media Foundation, The David Rockefeller Fund, Dextra Baldwin McGonagle Foundation, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Dubose & Dorothy Heyward Fund, The Gramercy Park Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, Howard Gilman Foundation, The Hyde and Watson Foundation, James E. Robison Foundation, Jerome Robbins Foundation, Jewish Communal Fund, Jody and John Arnhold, Joseph & Joan Cullman Foundation for the Arts, Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., The Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, The New York City Cultural Agenda Fund in The New York Community Trust, The New York Community Trust—Lila Acheson Wallace Fund for the Arts, The New York Community Trust—LuEsther T. Mertz Advised Fund, New York University Community Fund, O’Donnell-Green Music and Dance Foundation, The Ready Foundation, The RYL Charitable Fund, The Scherman Foundation’s Katherine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund, the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, SHS Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, and Stavros Niarchos Foundation. Gibney Dance receives additional support through the matching gift programs of Macy’s, The Moody’s Foundation, Morgan Stanley and The Open Society Foundations. Gibney Dance has received gracious encouragement from Eliot Feld’s Ballet Tech.

Gibney Dance Corporate Support

American Australian Association, Bloomingdale’s, Con Edison, Credit Suisse, EILEEN FISHER, Fram Realty LLC/Abro Management Corporation, Goldman Sachs, Kennedy Berg LLP, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, Macy’s Merchandising Group, Morgan Stanley, Pfizer Foundation, Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, and Wyndham Worldwide Corporation.

Gibney Dance Government Support

Gibney Dance has received generous support from The City of New York & The Honorable Mayor Bill De Blasio, The New York City Council & The Honorable Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, The Honorable City Council Member Margaret Chin, The Honorable Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and The Honorable Tom Finkelpearl, Materials for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, the New York Council for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Embassy of the United States, Dar es Salaam.


http://www.gibneydance.org


For more information, please contact Chris Schimpf or Carla Sacks at Sacks & Co., 212.741.1000.