Photo credit (top row l-r): Tendayi Kuumba by AngieMLV Photography, Thomas DeFrantz by Christopher Duggan, Kayla Farrish by Emilee Harney; (bottom row l-r) Gibney Company by Nir Arieli, Soles of Duende by Corey Rives, Brotherhood Dance by Ryan Muir. / click for hi-res version


GIBNEY PRESENTS WINTER/SPRING 2020 SEASON

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
Gibney Presents—Flagship Series Featuring New Works by Brother(hood) Dance! and Thomas F. DeFrantz/SLIPPAGE

Work Up 6.0—Signature Annual Residency, Professional Development and Performance Program Presenting Triple-Bill Evenings by Emerging Dance and Performance Artists

Spotlight—Commissions by Kayla Farrish/Decent Structures Arts, Tendayi Kuumba with Greg Purnell and Soles of Duende

Gibney Company Performs New Works by
Banning Bouldin, Mark Caserta and Yin Yue

Company Curated—Performances by Antonio Brown, Gregory Dolbashian/The DASH Ensemble, Alanna Morris-Van Tassel and Micaela Taylor

Solo for Solo—New Solos Performed by Paul Hamilton, Paloma McGregor and Darrin Wright Choreographed by Zui Gomez, Wendell Gray II and Marion Spencer

Living Gallery—Free Monthly Performances in the Gibney Gallery by Linda LaBeija, Katy Pyle/Ballez, Robin Sokoloff, Jaclynn Villamil, Don Waisanen and Nia Witherspoon

Sorry I Missed Your Show Screening and Discussion Series Featuring Tess Dworman, La’June McMillian and Narcissister with Gabri Christa

Plus, Engagement Events Including Sorry I Missed Your Show Screening and Discussion Series, Long Tables and a Black Womxn Summit

Today, leading performing arts and social justice nonprofit Gibney unveils its Winter/Spring 2020 Season at Gibney 280 Broadway in Lower Manhattan. Organized around the theme of Walls Down!, Gibney Senior Curatorial Director Eva Yaa Asantewaa notes, “It is a good time to examine the walls in our lives and world and ask, in all honesty, who and what they really serve. Walls Down! asks you to consider what walls you have built that keep you from seeing too far beyond the familiar and easy. What walls prevent you from seeing humanity in others and the expansive potential in yourself? It asks the maker and witness of art to question stale assumptions, confront injustice, excite the mind and strengthen the heart with joy and hope.”

Season highlights include (see below for full details):

ï Gibney Presents, the organization’s premier presenting series, continues with new evening-length works by Brother(hood) Dance! and Thomas F. DeFrantz/SLIPPAGE (January);

ï Work Up 6.0, the sixth edition of Gibney’s signature residency, professional development and performance program supporting emerging dance and performance artists, presents triple-bill evenings with Gabriella Carmichael, Wendell Gray II, Kalliope+Symara, Clement Mensah & Michel Kouakou: CO.to.GHA dance project, Glenn Potter-Takata a.k.a. GORN, Emma Rose Brown, Ramona Sekulovic, Audre Wirtanen and Christine C. Wyatt (March);

ï Spotlight, Gibney’s commissioning and presenting program highlighting the work of select developing artists, presents evenings by Kayla Farrish/Decent Structures Arts, Tendayi Kuumba with Greg Purnell and Soles of Duende (April);

ï Gibney Company performs new works by Banning Bouldin, Mark Caserta and Yin Yue around the theme INSIDER/OUTSIDER (April);

ï Company Curated, through which Gibney Company presents the work of choreographers who share the values of its unique model, features performances by Antonio Brown, Gregory Dolbashian/The DASH Ensemble, Alanna Morris-Van Tassel and Micaela Taylor (June);

ï Solo for Solo, a split-bill evening of new solos choreographed by developing choreographers Zui Gomez, Wendell Gray II and Marion Spencer, performed by veteran performers Paul Hamilton, Paloma McGregor and Darrin Wright (June);

ï Living Gallery, a free monthly program in the Gibney Gallery presenting live performances of storytelling, monologues, spoken word, stand-up or creative talks, featuring Linda LaBeija, Katy Pyle/Ballez, Robin Sokoloff, Jaclynn Villamil, Don Waisanen and Nia Witherspoon (monthly, February-June);

ï Sorry I Missed Your Show, Gibney’s free dance screening and discussion series, featuring Tess Dworman, La’June McMillian and Narcissister with Gabri Christa (February, May, June);

ï Engagement Events including a Black Womxn Summit and Long Tables on topics including Latina/x In Dance & Performance, Dance Photography, and Does Dance Matter to America? (February–June).

Formed in 1991 by Gina Gibney, Gibney boasts over 25 years of international performance through Gibney Company; social justice and humanitarian work on a global scale through Gibney Community Action; and forward-thinking service to the performing arts community through the two-venue Gibney Center at 890 and 280 Broadway. As always, the season includes a full slate of Gibney’s professional development and educational programs; over 365 Movement Workshops a year that use dance to support survivors of intimate partner violence; in-school assemblies that work to promote healthy relationships and prevent violence for youth; and robust social justice programming at the Community Action Hub at 280 Broadway, as well as internationally as part of Gibney’s Global Community Action Residency program.

WINTER/SPRING 2020 PERFORMANCE DETAILS
(CHRONOLOGICAL BY SERIES):


All performances take place at Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street). Tickets, venue accessibility and additional information available in January 2020 at GibneyDance.org/Performance.

GIBNEY PRESENTS
January 2020

Gibney Presents, curated by Senior Curatorial Director Eva Yaa Asantewaa, is Gibney’s premier presentation series, offering a rich blend of dance and performance in fully produced, evening-length commissions.

Thomas F. DeFrantz/SLIPPAGE
Soundz at the Back of my Head

January 9–10 at 6 p.m.
January 11 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 55 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The Black Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Soundz at the Back of my Head is the third and final installment of the talkingdance series begun with …i am black [you have to be willing to not know] and continued with white privilege. This dialogic manifesto talking-dancing-technology work engages its audience with the contradictory impulses that run through the creative imagination of an artist working within experimental performance and the afterlives of slavery. Like the first two installments, this new original hour-long creation will rely on a well-developed text and at least two interfaces that will translate the performer’s gestures and words into media as sound, image, light.

Brother(hood) Dance!
Afro/Solo/Man

January 9–10 at 8 p.m.
January 11 at 6 p.m.
Approximate run time: 75 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

A multi-disciplinary meditation exploring the identities of individual Black men relating to provocative themes such as origins, nourishment, heritage, nature, sexuality and technology in the 21st century. It is a bio-mythography that uses multimedia, dance and storytelling to engage the audience in the personal journey of two men who question and investigate connections to their ancestors, personal memories and experiences with life and death. These are not stories of Black men that we think we know. This work challenges assumptions and provokes rethinking. Afro/Solo/Man is unafraid to take on all socio-cultural demons around race, gender, sexuality and brother(hood).

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LIVING GALLERY
February–June 2020
Living Gallery, curated by Eva Yaa Asantewaa and produced in the Gibney Gallery, presents live performance of storytelling, monologues, spoken word, stand-up or creative talks. Each performance—free and open to the public—is scheduled within the hour before a dance concert presented in Gibney’s Theater.

Linda LaBeija
February 7 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 30 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Linda LaBeija presents excerpts from Adjusting My Crown, her first studio project. The performance is set to combine interpretive movement with elements of house, spoken word, hip-hop and R&B. Witness her exploration into the reality of Black trans mortality as she confronts issues around race, sex, love and gender. May audiences leave changed, reignited and uplifted after this rallying call.

Jaclynn Villamil
Tai Chi & Movement Awareness

February 28 at 6:30 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Jaclynn Villamil introduces her practice of Tai Chi. Through steady concentration, the Tai Chi practitioner releases muscular tension to access a rapidfire reaction from the nervous system. In dance technique, we usually think of efficient body use and relaxation as positives, but Tai Chi has an entirely different premise. Here, ease of motion belies the power of instantaneous action that can redirect an attack or strike back with lightning speed. Villamil’s presentation includes Grandmaster William C.C. Chen’s 60 Movements, Yang Style, Short Form. Audience participation is welcome and experience is not required.

Katy Pyle/Ballez
Getting The Wilis

March 13 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 30 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

In this Living Gallery, Katy Pyle will discuss the separatist ghosts in the ballet Giselle, known as the Wilis, and how they have inspired both historical research and the revealing of personal narratives embedded in Ballez’s forthcoming “Giselle of Loneliness.” Pyle will discuss representations of suffering, despair and suicidality in the original Giselle ballet, and how we are taught to view and perceive female suffering through that lens. Pyle will also discuss how marginalized queer people are ghosts embedded in the hidden histories of ballet culture, training and technique, and how Ballez seeks to make them visible.

Robin Sokoloff
April 3 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 30 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Robin Sokoloff, Founder of Town Stages, holds a fireside chat on the success, failure, heartbreak and lessons she is learning while building one of the largest women-owned and women-led cultural arts spaces in Manhattan—and why doing so with no outside funding was absolutely insane, and absolutely necessary. There will be laughter, there will be tears. There will be dancing if you are dancing too.

Nia Witherspoon
Conjuring With The Archive

May 1 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 30 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

As an artist equally concerned with truth (towards shaping reality towards justice) and magic (towards employing imaginative and symbolic properties to shape reality towards justice), Nia Witherspoon finds conjuring with the archive to be an organic ancestral practice. This Living Gallery will share a short talk about how this methodology informs Witherspoon’s own practice, and then engage participants in a workshop where they can add conjure to their own archival or documentary obsessions.

Don Waisanen
Improv Comedy for Democracy

June 12 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Free
The Gallery, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

This highly interactive, improvised comedy performance will construct an entertaining space for exploring new theatrical applications. With several improvisers from across NYC, the performance will also surface a deeper theme: given the social and political crises of our time, improv offers some new approaches for bridging differences, crafting connections and improving communities from the ground up. Improv is now being used around the world to train people to engage with one another in ways that promote empathy and understanding—all skills our world urgently needs.

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WORK UP
March 2020

Work Up is an annual residency, professional development and performance program that supports developing artists. Emphasizing the articulation of a choreographer’s ideas in both movement and language, Work Up artists are selected through a two-tiered application process including a written submission and a live audition. Friday performances will be followed by a talkback with the artists.

Work Up 6.1
Audre Wirtanen, Glenn Potter-Takata a.k.a. GORN, Christine C. Wyatt

March 5–7 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The White Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Audre Wirtanen: DX ME FIX ME

DX ME FIX ME is an intimate presentation of illness and disability shaped by the eugenic legacies in somatics, dance, medicine and science. It is about seeking care to attempt to heal and the medicalization of the femme body, and the relationship of those actions to the male gaze. The complexities of being abled-passing, while navigating systems that “care” for bodies, comes through as raw information for the audience to process in a sterile environment. DX ME FIX ME is a vulnerable act of resistance through owning a narrative of personal truth.

Glenn Potter-Takata a.k.a. GORN: postwar a sci-fi love rage

Glenn Potter-Takata a.k.a. GORN creates an imagined ritual practice to shamanize intergenerational trauma with the radioactive antagonist of Ishiro Honda’s Gojira (1954). Using the Gojira monster as a focal point, Potter-Takata uses video juxtaposed with live performance to create shadow iterations of his performing body, a response to the duality that is the byproduct of cultural transition.

Christine C. Wyatt: Ti’ed (the solo)

Ti’ed (the solo) centers Wyatt’s experience and the underlying narratives associated with her identity. This piece explores and exposes the social, political, emotional and psychological sources of exhaustion. This work “interrogates the American psyche,” questioning the conventions and constructs of society. Wyatt looks to history as a window into understanding the present to contend with the vicious cycle of trying to escape fatigue while being exhausted by it. The embodied text is a pursuit of liberation and release.

Work Up 6.2
Wendell Grey II, Kalliope+Symara, Ramona Sekulovic

March 12–14 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The White Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Wendell Gray II: FIELD, field

FIELD, field is a duet that plays with the yearning for personal freedom. Inspired by Khalil Joseph’s film The Mirror Between Us, Wendell Gray II and his collaborator Stephanie Carlos embody the duality of one person in the privacy of their room. Assisted by various objects, Gray and Carlos imagine and search a vast space beyond the walls they create, a place of fantasy and indulgence, pleasure and access, moving beyond the traps of flat reality.

Kalliope+Symara: What we did there the last time we’re now gonna drag out for some time

Kalliope+Symara, comprised of Kalliope Piersol and Symara Johnson, use a detailed score of text, setting, sound, space and the narrative of chosen sisterhood to create an enlivened space which prioritizes honesty and spontaneity. This work has been in process for four years and is the product of a collection of interdisciplinary mapping systems.

Ramona Sekulovic: UNI

In UNI, Ramona Sekulovic investigates what it means to be present. What constitutes presence in both a performer and the audience? How is a performer’s presence intimately related to technique? Sekulovic suggests that we can only connect and communicate while being fully present. Movement and short personal monologues reflect findings of Sekulovic’s research and recall fleeting past moments in ongoing navigations.

Work Up 6.3
Emma Rose Brown, Gabriella Carmichael, Clement Mensah & Michel Kouakou: CO.to.GHA dance project

March 19–21 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The White Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Emma Rose Brown: Simul-cast

Simul-cast is a highly specific improvisational structure that attempts to language physicality and track the multiple nature of perception. Performers act as sports commentators, describing what is happening in real time in the body of another performer, preceding the power of the viewer to name what they see. Listening back to this audio, performers relive, remember and reenact their immediate past. Moving from frantic speaking to silence, this work is simultaneously performance, game and documentation, offering an alternative way of taking in the world in real time.

Gabriella Carmichael: learning to see in the dark

learning to see in the dark is a solo study in undoing pain. It is inspired by the forest, the spaces between the stars, forgotten trauma, sadness, a fear of heights, the lessons we learn from lying, self-care practices and the places we call home. Intertwined with personal and collective memories, voice and poetry, this work confronts and theatricalizes landscapes of queer womanhood. This work honors femme power and the moments that make us feel brave.

Clement Mensah & Michel Kouakou: CO.to.GHA dance project: AKANE

In AKANE, two contemporary African choreographers share a cultural journey. Mensah (from Ghana) and Kouakou (from Ivory Coast) first met in New York in 2009 and realized they have much in common besides migrating from Africa to live and dance in the United States. Coming from the Akan people of West Africa, they share ethnic heritage. Together, these artists investigate historic connections through movement, collaboration and the lens of their respective cultures. How does the experience of an African living in one’s homeland differ from the experience of an African in diaspora?

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SPOTLIGHT
March & April 2020

Spotlight is Gibney’s commissioning and presenting program highlighting the work of select developing artists, curated by Eva Yaa Asantewaa.

Kayla Farrish/Decent Structures Arts
Martyr Fiction

March 26–28 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Martyr Fiction is an exploration of dreams, fantasy and visions in evaluation with a reality we cannot escape. Dreams are for those who can afford them. Rooted in what we know, we can only stretch our conscious imagination as far as we understand. Yet, sometimes, we experience sudden wake-up calls when we are fully conscious. What are the night terrors and dreams of an African American? Who are the stars of these dreams? In uprisings, lucid dreaming and endless loops, we unveil the possibility of imagination and the individual—through movement, script and sound score. What parts of reality do we succumb to or finally confront?

Tendayi Kuumba with Greg Purnell
Unidentified Fly Objects (U.F.O.): Stardust Melanin

April 16–18 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: TBA
Tickets: $15–20
The Black Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Unidentified Fly Objects (U.F.O.): Stardust Melanin is an investigation of the power we inherently possess as ancestral magical beings and explores the polarity of the god/goddess consciousness from the inside out. Stardust Melanin questions the need for answers, definitions, and tangible findings to seek the unknown and misunderstood powers. In a compilation of science, love, loss, magic, and spirits, worlds converge into one musical galaxy. Through original scoring, a folkloric journey is reimagined by Tendayi Kuumba and Greg Purnell, bonding worlds and resurrecting the Feminine Divine.

Soles of Duende
Can We Dance Here?

April 23–25 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–20
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

With Can We Dance Here?, the three storytellers of Soles of Duende explore the concept of permission and trust as they journey towards their individual and collective freedoms. In an evening of rhythmic exchange including live music by prominent NYC live artists and rooted in improvisation, the trio brings the audience on a journey to the revelation of pure freedom as three strong women taking the floor…and making NOISE.

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GIBNEY COMPANY
April & June 2020

INSIDER/OUTSIDER
New Works by Banning Bouldin, Mark Caserta and Yin Yue
Performed by Gibney Company

April 9–11 at 8 p.m.
April 11 at 2 p.m.
Approximate run time: 75 minutes
Tickets: $20–25
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Gibney Company celebrates diverse voices in the field with INSIDER/OUTSIDER, welcoming choreographers from across the country: Banning Bouldin, Mark Caserta and Yin Yue.

INSIDER/OUTSIDER is an investigation of duality and intersectionality. Through this evening of dance, the Company is interested in exploring how in life we can be both insiders and outsiders, privileged and oppressed. How do these dual identities live next to one another and what can they teach us about ourselves and others? Can recognizing the ways in which we ourselves are outsiders help us empathize with the “otherness” of the people, cultures and ideas we encounter? Can recognizing the ways in which we are insiders galvanize us to create space to celebrate the differences of those around us?

Mark Caserta joins the season as the second annual Gibney Company/Springboard EMERGE Choreographic Award recipient, a partnership between the Company and Springboard Danse Montréal which aims to cultivate, mentor and actualize the burgeoning visions of today’s young artists toward becoming tomorrow’s creative leaders in the field.

COMPANY CURATED

Company Curated is an outlet for Gibney Company to present the work of diverse choreographers who share the values of its unique model, viewing dance artists as innovators, generators and activists. Now in its fourth annual season, the Company has curated this series prioritizing creators who work with an aesthetic of physical rigor, uncompromising tenacity and a drive to move the dance field forward. Gibney Company aims to make space for entrepreneurial artists who are using their craft to amplify the relevancy of the dance community and position dancers as influential citizens in the world.

COMPANY CURATED:
Alanna Morris-Van Tassel & Micaela Taylor

June 18–20 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–$20
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

COMPANY CURATED:
Antonio Brown & Gregory Dolbashian/The DASH Ensemble

June 25–27 at 8 p.m.
Approximate run time: 60 minutes
Tickets: $15–$20
The Theater, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

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SOLO FOR SOLO
June 2020

Solo for Solo, created and curated by Eva Yaa Asantewaa, is a series of commissioned solos made by developing choreographers expressly for veteran performers. The performers also mentor the choreographers through a one-on-one collaborative process that serves to broaden and deepen the art. The evening consists of a low-tech showing of three works-in-progress, followed by a reception.

Solo for Solo
Choreographers: Zui Gomez, Wendell Gray II, Marion Spencer
Performers: Paul Hamilton, Paloma McGregor, Darrin Wright

June 2 at 7 p.m.
Approximate run time: 90 minutes
Tickets: $10
The White Box, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Choreographer: Marion Spencer
Performer: Darrin Wright

Choreographer: Zui Gomez
Performer: Paloma McGregor

Choreographer: Wendell Gray II
Performer: Paul Hamilton

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WINTER/SPRING 2020 ENGAGEMENT EVENT DETAILS
(CHRONOLOGICAL BY SERIES):


All events take place at Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street). Tickets and additional information available at GibneyDance.org/Calendar.

LONG TABLES
Curated by Senior Curatorial Director Eva Yaa Asantewaa, this series of conversations and experiential gatherings highlights important issues in the dance community. Long Table conversations adopt performance artist Lois Weaver’s non-hierarchical Long Table format, encouraging informal conversation around topics of concern to the community.

Latina/x In Dance & Performance
February 5, 7–9 p.m.
Free
Studio V, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Guest Host: Alicia Diaz
Core Participants: Beatrice Capote, Yanira Castro, Mariana Valencia, Larissa Velez-Jackson

What are the burning issues facing Latina/x dancers and performers today? How do we bridge disciplines and geography to build stronger community? Join guest host Alicia Diaz for conversation, music and comida as we find culturally relevant ways to deepen our discourse.

Does Dance Matter to America?

March 4, 7–9 p.m.
Free
Studio V, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Guest Host: Danni Gee
Core Participants: Ayodele Casel, Maura Nguyen Donohue, Brinda Guha, Joya Powell, Aynsley Vandenbroucke

Zooming out from an immediate community of dancers and dance lovers, does dance matter to America? What potential exists for dance to serve a purpose in the lives of “non-dancers,” and how can we meet it? Join guest host Danni Gee to talk about bridging the gap and using this discipline in ways that matter.

Dance Photography
June 10, 7–9 p.m.
Free
Studio V, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Guest Host: Preston Miller
Core Participants: Maria Baranova, Ian Douglas, Kevin Richardson, Scott Shaw

Join guest host Preston Miller for an open dialogue on the experiences and perspectives of dance photographers, as we talk about the practice of capturing an ephemeral form.

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SORRY I MISSED YOUR SHOW

A screening and discussion series, Sorry I Missed Your Show highlights dance works from the recent past to explore their relationship to the dance canon and contemporary practice. All events are free and open to the public.

Tess Dworman
February 11, 6:30–8 p.m.
Free
The Lab, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Tess Dworman facilitates a conversation about improvisation in performance. Using her recent work as examples, she’ll discuss her process of structuring and directing improvisation as well as some mistakes she made along the way.

Narcissister with Gabri Christa

May 13, 6:30–8 p.m.
Free
The Lab, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Award-winning artists Narcissister and Gabri Christa share reflections on creative practice, family history and personal narrative in dance, performance, and film.

La’June McMillian
The Black Movement Project

June 17, 6:30–8 p.m.
Free
The Lab, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

In the past few years, access to motion capture data, 3D base models and software to “make an animation of yourself” has skyrocketed. From MakeHuman to Mixamo to CMU’s motion capture database, the ability to make and finish polished projects has become easier for many. While these resources are extremely helpful to create a range of projects, they lack the tools to create diverse characters and movements unexplored by systems that center assumptions of neutrality. The Black Movement Project (BMP) is an online database of Black motion capture data and Black character base models. BMP is a tool for activists, performers and artists to create diverse XR projects, a space to research how and why we move and an archive of Black existence. The Black Movement Project seeks to not only catalog movement, but to create community through the use of performances, workshops, conversations and tool making. McMillian will share video clips and samples from The Black Movement Project and work through some questions. What does it mean to ethically digitize Black movement? How do we protect data that is collected, and how can it better serve and celebrate the community? How can we effectively challenge digital tools that don’t share these values, and gain control and ownership of our collective future?

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BEWHOLE AND BEHELD
AN OFFERING FROM DU’BOIS A’KEEN AND KINGSLEY IBENECHE


February 18, 6–8:00 p.m.
Free
Studio C, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Through a series of performance vignettes, dance artists Du’Bois A’Keen and Kingsley Ibeneche invite us to see and be seen, to testify and to witness. We will create space to interrogate and celebrate Black masculinity through a montage of memories and manifestos—both performative and interactive. We journey to be whole, in the fullness of our power, and to be held, in the place where we need to heal, engaging with personal and collective thoughts, questions and realizations concerning masculinity, maleness and manhood. Can you imagine yourself fully healed and whole? Come, let’s work!

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BLACK WOMXN SUMMIT

With Black Womxn Summit Parts I & II, Senior Curatorial Director Eva Yaa Asantewaa has invited a curatorial committee to design two special events celebrating community, artistry and activism grounded in values and aspirations that have endured times of challenge.

Part I: Long Table
Strength & Solidarity: A Re/Connecting of Black Womxn Artists

April 1, 7–9:00 p.m.
Free
Studio V, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Guest Host: Alice Sheppard
Core Participants: Kayla Hamilton, nia love, Shalewa Mackall, Channie Waites

Poet June Jordan reminded us that “we are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” Black dance artists who also experience gender oppression as non-binary, cis, fluid, trans, femme, a-gen folx continually answer the call to address a world that often excludes us. Let’s come together and check in with one another at this Long Table. How can we co-learn as we navigate careers in the dance field? How can we make room for being vulnerable and open with each other? We don’t know everything and don’t have to pretend we do. Instead, let’s hold space for all of our uniquely singular identities, experiences, intersectionalities, challenges—and wins! This event is by, about and for Black womxn. We are asking for only people who identify as Black women/womxn and POC folx of diverse genders to attend this event.

Part II: Networking Night
Working Our Collective Knowledge

May 1, 7–9 p.m.
Free
Studio V, Gibney 280 Broadway (entrance at 53A Chambers Street)

Facilitator: Indira Goodwine

Following the April Long Table (Strength and Solidarity: A Re/Connecting of Black Womxn Artists), we gather again to explore next steps and future possibilities for Black dance artists and art administrators. We continue to (re)build our individual and collective practice. We take the time to celebrate showing up as our full selves. Let’s focus on building relationships and get in touch with how each of us can both offer and receive a better quality of support. This event is by, about and for Black womxn. We are asking for only people who identify as Black women/womxn and POC folx of diverse genders to attend this event.

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ABOUT GIBNEY

Gibney has used movement to transform and inspire for nearly 30 years. Gibney’s story began in 1991, when choreographer Gina Gibney founded her socially active dance company with a single dance studio to call home. The organization has rapidly evolved into a performing arts and social justice powerhouse. Gibney is now home to thousands of artists and community members across two New York City locations, totaling 23 studios, 5 performance spaces, and 52,000 square feet of space. Gibney’s mission is to tap into the vast potential of movement, creativity and performance to effect social change and personal transformation. Gibney’s vision is to deploy resources and bring together disparate communities to ignite a cultural renaissance that has ripple effects for society far beyond the studio and stage. Gibney’s mission and vision come to life through a stunning resident repertory company, impactful community action initiatives, and thriving performing arts centers.

CENTER
Gibney is a powerhouse of support for the performing arts community and New York City itself. In recent years, the organization has emerged as a cultural leader operating 53,000 square feet, including 23 studios and 5 performance spaces across two Manhattan locations. Yet, Gibney is so much more than space. Informed by its extensive history of serving the dance field and a thirst for effective innovation, Gibney provides a holistic artistic ecosystem. It’s designed to serve artists throughout their entire careers, at all stages of process, and in a variety of roles in society. From training, creation, and production, to integrating new technologies, to artist and audience development, Gibney activates the full continuum of cultural practice. The greater social context in which artists and audiences live and work remains the driving, unifying force fueling all Gibney initiatives.

COMPANY
Gibney Company, led by Artistic Director Gina Gibney with Directors Amy Miller and Nigel Campbell, is Gibney’s acclaimed resident dance ensemble. Company members are full time Artistic Associates who contribute not only as performing artists, but also as activists and cultural entrepreneurs. With an unrelenting focus on artistic excellence and social integrity, Gibney Company co-creates an environment where dancers are activated towards their full artistic, entrepreneurial, and socially minded selves through rigorous physical, intellectual, and interpersonal practices. In addition to creation and performance, the Artistic Associates are highly engaged in the organization’s Community programs and are cultivated as entrepreneurs and leaders in the field.

COMMUNITY
Gibney is at the forefront of mobilizing the arts to address social justice issues. The organization’s highly respected programs use movement to transform lives through multiple platforms, including: Movement Workshops, which empower domestic violence survivors; Hands are for Holding assemblies and residencies, which engage New York City youth on the topic of violence and bullying prevention; and Moving Toward Justice, which mobilizes artists to respond to social issues. Gibney values all that artists have to offer as makers, activists and entrepreneurs and allows these skillsets to flourish under one roof and reverberate back into the community.

FUNDING CREDITS

Gibney Foundation Support
Altman Foundation, Amazon Smile Foundation, Arnhold Foundation, The Artis Grant Program, Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Dextra Baldwin McGonagle Foundation, The Bay & Paul Foundations, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Booth Ferris Foundation, Bossak/Heilbron Charitable Foundation, Boy Scouts of America National Foundation, The Carey Foundation, Concord Baptist ChristFund, Joseph & Joan Cullman Foundation for the Arts, Dance/NYC’s New York City Dance Rehearsal Space Subsidy Program, made possible by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Dancers Responding to AIDS/Broadway Cares, Inc., The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, The Lucius & Eva Eastman Fund, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Howard Gilman Foundation, The GriffinHarte Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, The Hearst Foundation, Dubose & Dorothy Heyward Memorial Fund, Prospect Hill Foundation, The Hyde and Watson Foundation, Jerome Foundation, Jerome Robbins Foundation, Foundation for a Just Society, Lotos Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Meringoff Family Foundation, LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, Morgan Stanley Foundation, The New York Community Trust, New York University Community Fund, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, NYSCA/TDF TAP Plus, Pfizer Foundation, Warburg Pincus Foundation, Suzanne Peck and Brian Friedman, Princess Grace Foundation-USA, The Ready Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Rockefeller Brothers Fund’s Charles E. Culpeper Arts and Culture Grant, The David Rockefeller Fund, Andrew Sabin Family Foundation, The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund, SeaChange Capital Partners, The SHS Foundation/Richard Feldman, The Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, The Shubert Foundation, Stonewall Community Foundation, Thompson Family Foundation, the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, the Trust for Mutual Understanding, and The Agnes Varis Trust.

Gibney Corporate Support

AMC Networks, Barbizon Lighting Company, Broadway Dance Center, Peter B. Cannell & Co. Inc., Capacity Interactive, Centerview Partners, Con Edison, Content Partners, LLC., DBI Projects, EILEEN FISHER, DLA Piper, Fram Realty LLC/Abro Management Corporation, Goldman Sachs, Grantmakers in the Arts, Kennedy Berg LLP, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, Macy’s, Matays Law Group PLLC, Morgan Stanley, New York Health & Racquet Club, Odd Dog Coffee, Safe Horizone, Sanctuary for Families, Slocum Construction Consulting Inc., Spectrum, Symbio Physiotherapy, and Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts. Gibney receives additional support through the matching gift programs of American Express, The Benevity Community Impact Fund - A Fund of the American Online Giving Foundation, Disney, JK Group, Inc., The Prospect Hill Foundation Matching Gift Program, Societe Generale, SONY Corporation, and Wyndham Worldwide Corporation.

Gibney Government Support
Gibney has received generous support from The City of New York & The Honorable Mayor Bill De Blasio, The New York City Council, The New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and The Honorable Tom Finkelpearl, The Honorable Former Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, The Honorable Speaker Corey Johnson, The Honorable City Council Member Margaret Chin, the Honorable Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, the Mayor's Grant for Cultural Impact with support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the Mayor's Office to End Domestic and Gender-Based Violence, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs’ CreateNYC Disability Forward Fund, Materials for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, the National Endowment for the Arts.


http://www.gibneydance.org


For more information, please contact Chris Schimpf, Zoë Sonnenberg or Carla Sacks at Sacks & Co., 212.741.1000.